Online dating vs traditional dating statistics

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“But the men I was introduced to were told what I wanted and shared those dreams. From the off we were on the same page and then it was only a matter of finding someone I also found physically attractive and that was Mark, the third man I met.” Wilkinson is far from alone.

One in five relationships in the UK starts online, according to recent surveys, and almost half of all British singles have searched for love on the internet.

Just today, nine million Britons will log on looking for love.

The result is that, rather than being someone that defies all calculation, love is now big business worth an annual billion internationally and growing at 70 per cent a year – with high-tech venture capitalists, psychologists and software engineers reaping vast rewards.

IRL one may get a better, more accurate sense of the person.

With the proliferation of dating apps and websites, it's no secret that it has become pretty common to start dating someone you met online.

“I was 33, had just broken up with my boyfriend and was beginning to think I’d never have a family life.

I’d always been attracted to mavericks, handsome men, who – after a year or so – made it clear they had no intention of settling down.

But the availability and options mean that there will be more dates, more short-term relationships, and more (healthy) break-ups than if you meet one guy every two years and go all in on him because you never meet anybody else. I am only speculating here, and this is only an opinion, but it’s easier to idealize someone you mentioned online than IRL.

Love in the time of computers is certainly proving to be an interesting and complex case study.

Anna Wilkinson has been married for seven years, has two young children, and – although exhausted – is delighted with her lot.

I try pretty hard not to give into confirmation bias.

Which is to say that I believe that online dating is a valuable tool in your dating arsenal.

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